The Writing Center

In-Class Workshops

Roadshows

For faculty who would like to introduce their students to the Writing Center’s services, we offer Roadshows, brief 5-minute classroom presentations delivered by one of our tutors. We provide these presentations for faculty classrooms or committees, or for any student group, department, or program. To request a Writing Center roadshow please email wcenter@gmu.edu and provide this information:

  • Your name and the name and number of the course
  • The date and time you would like the roadshow to take place, as well as an alternate, if your preferred date and time are unavailable
  • The location of the classroom or office where the presentation will take place
  • Whether the room has a computer and projector
  • Any special information the tutor should keep in mind (for example, you may want to let the tutor know in advance what types of writing assignments you require for your course)

We try to offer Roadshows on all campuses. Requests are granted in the order they are received via email and are subject to tutor availability.

Workshops

If you would like a team of our tutors to deliver a workshop in your class on one of the topics below, please contact us.  

The best workshops often become conversations among the presenters, the students, and the instructor. We invite instructors to discuss how the material in the workshop applies specifically to their courses and assignments, and we require that the instructor be present when tutors are delivering a workshop to the class.

This workshop presents the basics of developing and building an argument, with an emphasis on developing a sound thesis statement, generating and structuring supporting claims and evidence, and working with counterarguments. The workshop allows space for the course instructor and students to discuss the kinds of claims and evidence that they might develop, given the specific discipline, course, assignment, or audience. The workshop culminates in a group exercise in which students work in groups to generate and respond to arguments and counterarguments on an issue. (45 minutes)

In this workshop, writers learn and practice using a variety of strategies for generating ideas and structuring those ideas into a rough draft. Techniques include free-writing, sketching webs and maps, composing rough "discovery" drafts, and outlining. Instructors have the opportunity to comment on how particular techniques might work for specific writing tasks in the course. Writers leave this workshop with concrete verbal and visual tools for getting started on a writing project, as well as some strategies for dealing with writers' block. (45 minutes)

In this workshop, writers learn and practice strategies for seeing strengths and weaknesses in their own drafts and for revising accordingly. The workshop focuses on techniques writers can use to evaluate their drafts for whole-text concerns such as content development, line of argument, and structure. Students leave this workshop understanding the difference between revision and editing, and possessing concrete tools for discerning areas in which the draft can be further developed and improved. (50 minutes)

This session should be scheduled to coincide with students' having completed a first draft of a course assignment. Students bring a hard copy of their draft to the workshop and practice various techniques on that draft.

In this workshop, writers learn to provide feedback that addresses important issues in a draft, helps writers revise effectively, and maintains a positive relationship between writer and reviewer. Participants will discuss the benefits of learning to review other writers' drafts, learn to read a draft for whole-text, paragraph, and sentence-level concerns, and practice strategies for providing feedback that helps writers revise. (45 minutes)

In this presentation, students learn the benefits of citing sources, the kinds of material they need to cite, options for incorporating source material into their own prose, and how to find the guidelines for properly formatting those citations. Students discuss scenarios in which source material needs to be cited and they practice paraphrasing and summarizing sample sources. This workshop is not specific to any single citation style; it rather focuses on the broad logic and rhetoric of citing sources. (55 minutes)

Please note that this presentation does not address the mechanics and fine points of formatting in-text citations and lists of works cited.

This workshop focuses on helping students look up and apply the guidelines for using APA citation style for in-text citations and list of references. Student writers don't always learn effectively when tutors lecture on the numerous and detailed rules for properly presenting author names and page numbers, and formatting titles and publication information. In this workshop, therefore, Writing Center tutors walk student writers through the process of writing an in-text citation and an entry for the list of references, then guide the writers as they locate and apply relevant rules to their own drafts. (45 minutes)

This workshop should be scheduled to coincide with students' completing a draft of a document that incorporates sources. To participate in the workshop, students will need a draft (hard copy or electronic) and a laptop or tablet.

This workshop focuses on helping writers look up and apply the guidelines for using MLA citation style for in-text citations and list of works cited. Student writers don't always learn effectively when tutors lecture on the numerous and detailed rules for properly presenting author names and page numbers, and formatting titles and publication information. In this workshop, therefore, Writing Center tutors walk student writers through the process of writing an in-text citation and an entry for the list of works cited, then guide the writers as they locate and apply relevant rules to their own drafts. (45 minutes)

This workshop should be scheduled to coincide with students' completing a draft of a document that incorporates sources. To participate in the workshop, students will need a draft (hard copy or electronic) and a laptop or tablet.

In this workshop, writers learn to identify features of writing that make texts murky and difficult to understand, and learn and practice five strategies for revising murky writing to make it clearer. (50 minutes)

In this hour-and-fifteen-minute workshop, participants will gain tips and strategies for using language, grammar, and style to their best advantage as they work to elevate the level of formality in their academic writing. Students will learn specific strategies for writing and editing, as well as begin to understand why particular kinds of language have come to be used in scholarly work. (75 minutes)

Description coming.

To request a workshop, please email us at wcenter@gmu.edu and note Workshop Request in the subject line. Campus Outreach Coordinator Robbie Maakestad will contact you to make arrangements. Please include this information:

  • Your name and the name and number of the course
  • The topic of the workshop you'd like us to offer
  • The date and time you would like the workshop to take place, as well as an alternative, if your preferred date and time are unavailable
  • The location of the classroom where the presentation will take place
  • The number of students in the course

Professional Development Workshops for Faculty

The Writing Across the Curriculum program offers professional development workshops to faculty who want assistance developing writing assignments or assessments. To request those services, please contact Dr. Michelle LaFrance, WAC Director, at mlafran2@gmu.edu.

For Tutors

Here is the link to the Roadshow Prezi to present during roadshows.  

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